Definition

People have implicit theories of intelligence, which can be “entity theories”, which view intelligence as fixed, or “incremental theories”, which view intelligence as malleable (Dweck, 1999). People having an incremental implicit theory of intelligence have a “growth mindset” and believe that intelligence can be learned and that the brain can grow from exercise and practice. This determines the goals they pursue, their responses to difficulty, and their task performance (Dweck, 2006).

This competence can be assessed according to the following three students’ mastery levels:

Introductory level

Believes that intelligence is static; does not apply for improvement; avoids effort, criticism and challenges and feels threatened by the success of others.

Intermediate level

Considers intelligence both static and dynamic; sometimes applies for improvement; can afford a few effort and moderate challenges; does not care about criticism and the success of others.

Advanced level

Believes that intelligence is dynamic; applies for improvement; sees effort as a path to mastery; embraces challenges, learns from criticism; feels inspired by the success of others.


Tools for Assessment

On the right you will find the assessment tools that can be used to measure this competence.

Click on the tool name to access the tool.